Virus and bullous dermatosis - x

Virus and bullous dermatosis

For More Medical and Healthcare related Services Visit : http://www.medverdict.com For More Medical and Healthcare related Services Visit : http://www.medverdict.com bullous dermatosis treatment bullous dermatosis definition bullous dermatosis pictures bullous dermatosis of childhood bullous dermatosis bullous dermatosis of hemodialysis bullous dermatosis of dialysis bullous dermatosis ppt bullous dermatosis wiki bullous dermatosis associated with vancomycin extravasation bullous dermatitis artefacta bullous autoimmune dermatoses bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis a case report bullous atopic dermatitis autoimmune bullous dermatoses a review linear iga bullous dermatosis antigen autoimmune bullous dermatosis acantholytic bullous dermatosis acute bullous dermatosis bullous dermatosis of childhood induced by gemfibrozil bullous dermatosis childhood bullous dermatosis causes bullous dermatitis causes bullous contact dermatitis linear iga bullous dermatosis childhood linear iga bullous dermatosis causes chronic bullous dermatosis chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood chronic bullous dermatosis pictures bullous dermatosis dialysis bullous dermatosis diabetes bullous dermatoses definition bullous dermatitis differential diagnosis bullous dermatitis definition linear iga bullous dermatosis drug induced define bullous dermatosis bullous dermatosis emedicine bullous dermatosis elderly bullous exfoliative dermatitis dermatitis bullous eruptions bullous eczematous dermatitis linear iga bullous dermatosis eye subepidermal bullous dermatosis with eosinophils bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis bullous dermatitis herpetiformis bullous dermatitis herpetiformis definition bullous hand dermatitis bullous hemorrhagic dermatitis heparin-induced bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis bullous dermatosis images bullous iga dermatosis bullous dermatitis icd 9 code bullous dermatitis icd 9 bullous dermatitis images bullous dermatitis icd dermatitis bullous including erythema multiforme autoimmune bullous dermatoses in the elderly iga bullous dermatosis treatment bullous lichenoid dermatitis bullous lupus dermatitis linear bullous dermatosis lichenoid bullous dermatitis linear iga bullous dermatosis medscape bullous dermatoses nec bullous dermatosis nos bullous neutrophilic dermatosis transient bullous dermatosis newborn bullous dermatosis of neonate bullous dermatosis of pregnancy bullous dermatosis of diabetes transient bullous dermatosis of the newborn chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood treatment chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood emedicine bullous dermatoses ppt bullous dermatitis pictures bullous dermatitis photos bullous dermatitis ppt bullous dermatitis pemphigoid bullous pustular dermatitis bullous dermatitis remeron autoimmune bullous dermatoses review bullous dermatoses review bullous dermatoses symptoms bullous dermatitis skin chronic bullous dermatosis skin bullous stasis dermatitis linear iga bullous dermatosis symptoms subepidermal bullous dermatosis subepithelial bullous dermatosis subcorneal bullous dermatosis bullous dermatosis test bullous dermatitis treatment linear iga bullous dermatosis treatment linear iga bullous dermatosis vancomycin bullous dermatitis wiki linear iga bullous dermatosis wiki bullous dermatosis 694.9 http://www.phwiki.com/

Linear IgA Dermatosis - Bullous Disease of Childhood - x

Linear IgA Dermatosis - Bullous Disease of Childhood

Linear IgA disease (LAD) typically occurs after puberty with the majority of cases presenting after the age of 40. Chronic bullous disease of childhood (CBDC) usually presents before the age of 5. Both have a slight female predominance. Patients with LAD present with pruritic, annular, or grouped papules, vesicles, or bullae distributed symmetrically on extensor surfaces. The clinical presentation may be indistinguishable from that of dermatitis herpetiformis. Patients may also present with lesions that appear similar to those found in bullous pemphigoid or epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. Oral and conjunctival surfaces may be involved resembling cicatricial pemphigoid. Rarely systemic symptoms such as fever, arthritis, arthralgias, and malaise may occur. This disorder has been associated with the intake of many drugs including vancomycin, lithium, and diclofenac. These patients also demonstrate a small increased risk of lymphoid malignancy. In CBDC, young patients present with clustered, tense bullae, often on an inflammatory base giving a cluster of jewels appearance. Lesions are typically located in the perineum and perioral region. New lesions may appear around the periphery of previous lesions giving a giving the appearance of a collarette of blisters. The sensation of pruritus or burning is common. For both disorders, blister formation is either within the lamina lucida or in the sublamina densa. On histopathologic exam, one finds subepidermal bullae with neutrophils along the basement membrane and at the papillary tips. Direct immuonfluorescence demonstrates linear IgA and indirect IF is typically positive for low titer circulating IgA antibodies. On salt-split skin, linear IgA deposits may be located in the lamina lucida similar to bullous pemphigoid, at and below the lamina densa similar to epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, or in both locations. Both diseases are acquired autoimmune disorders that occur secondary to the formation of IgA antibodies that interact with a number of different antigenic targets. Circulating IgA antibodies that bind the epidermal side of salt-split skin typically bind to a 97 to 120 kDa antigen that is identical to a portion of the extracellur domain of BPAG 2 (180 kDa hemidesmosomal transmembrane antigen, also known as type XVII collagen). Circulating IgA antibodies that bind the dermal side of salt-split skin typically bind to the epidermolysis bullosa acquisita antigen, type VII collagen. There are also patients with a clinical presentation similar to cicatricial pemphigoid. These patients typically have IgA antibodies that bind to a 45 kDa antigen on the epidermal side of the basement membrane. The course of LAD is unpredictable but most have disease that is present for years. Remission is unlikely. In contrast, CBDC is often a self-limited disease with remission occurring within two years of disease onset.

Vesicular and Bullous Skin Diseases - x

Vesicular and Bullous Skin Diseases

Vesicular and Bullous Skin Diseases

Bullous Pemphigoid a Rare and Painful Skin Disease - x

Bullous Pemphigoid a Rare and Painful Skin Disease

Bullous Pemphigoid is a rare and painful skin disease that produces blisters throughout the body. The lymphatic system is right under your skin and plays a large role in this disease. Maintaining your lymphatic system is essential in helping Bullous Pemphigoid. This is a client of John Ossipnsky, developer of LymphPractic.

MNEMONICS - Vesiculobullous Diseases Differential Diagnosis - Oral Medicine and Pathology - x

MNEMONICS - Vesiculobullous Diseases Differential Diagnosis - Oral Medicine and Pathology

This video contains a mnemonics to memorise all the differential diagnosis of a vesiculobullous lesion relevant to dentistry. Viral Diseases: @ Measles Simply Variegated Her hand, foot and mouth. Measles (Rubeola) Herpes Simplex infection Varicella – Zoster infection Herpangina Hand-foot-and –mouth disease Immunologic Diseases: @ Men, Bull and Lad (boy) are immune to Dangerous and Vulgar Plays. Mucous membrane Pemphigoid Bullous pemphigoid LAD (Linear Immunoglobulin A bullous disease) Dermatitis Herpetiformis Pemphigus Vulgaris Please Like and Share if you love this video.

Bullous Disease - x

Bullous Disease

Familial Benign Pemphigus - Hailey and Hailey Disease - x

Familial Benign Pemphigus - Hailey and Hailey Disease

Familial benign pemphigus (Hailey-Hailey disease) is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with onset in adolescence or in early adulthood. Lesions are typically located in the axillae, groin, inframmary folds, and neck. Clinically, patients present with recurrent blisters, warty papules, vegetative lesions, and erosions with a characteristic fissured appearance. Involved areas tend look serpiginous due to peripheral spread of the lesions. The skin changes are uncomfortable and are exacerbated by friction, heat and pressure. They are often secondarily infected and malodorous. Mucosal surfaces are rarely involved. Nail involvement with longitudinal white streaking is common. Light microscopy reveals intraepidermal separation and acantholysis. Both direct and indirect immunofluorescence are negative. The disorder is thought to be due to abnormalities in cellular adhesion. Electron microscopic exam demonstrates abnormalities in the desmosomal complex as well as a decreased number of desmosomes on cell surfaces.

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